Wins, Losses, and Empty Seats: How Baseball Outlasted the Great Depression

By David George Surdam | Go to book overview
Save to active project

9. Radio and Baseball

Cheap newspapers had been the new mass medium of the nineteenth century. Baseball owners gradually reached a mutually beneficial accommodation with the medium. During the 1920s a new mass medium arose: radio. By the end of the Depression era another mass medium, television, threatened to supplant radio.

Baseball owners were not sure how to deal with radio broadcasts of games. Some owners believed that radio broadcasts would strengthen their drawing power, as broadcasts would serve as a form of advertising and would whet the fans’ appetite for tickets. Other owners feared that radio broadcasts would be too good a substitute for actual attendance at a game and would decrease the gate. Some observers disagreed with the idea that a broadcast could substitute for attending in person. Sportswriter Harry Hartman claimed that, “A sport fan will not be content with a broadcast if he is able to attend… [but if for any reason a fan is not able to attend a sporting event, he tunes in and remains sport conscious.”1 Another observer wrote, “Their show [baseball games] is a spectacle. It isn’t something to be heard, but to be seen. Only the ear properly attuned can hear at a baseball game and become rhapsodized.”2

Entrepreneurs had already broadcast games using telegraphs and large billboards. These endeavors often attracted large crowds on city streets. There was, of course, a delay between the action and the reporting. In many cases, radio broadcasts suffered from similar delays.

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wins, Losses, and Empty Seats: How Baseball Outlasted the Great Depression
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?