Wins, Losses, and Empty Seats: How Baseball Outlasted the Great Depression

By David George Surdam | Go to book overview

Appendix 2
Dramatis Personae

Phil Ball: Owner of the St. Louis Browns until his death in 1932. He claimed he rarely turned a profit on the club.

E. S. Barnard: American League president from 1928–31.

Donald Barnes: Owner of the St. Louis Browns. Barnes wanted to relocate the hapless Browns to Los Angeles but was thwarted by the Japanese Navy’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

Edward Barrow: General manager of the New York Yankees. He presaged Billy Beane and other modern general managers who emphasized getting patient sluggers.

Sam Breadon: Owner of the St. Louis Cardinals until 1947.

Walter Briggs: Owner of the Detroit Tigers from 1920 to 1952.

Ty Cobb: Greatest hitter and base runner of the “Dead Ball Era.” He was a savvy investor who died rich and a known curmudgeon. He was more fortunate than Babe Ruth in the actors chosen to portray him (Tommy Lee Jones played Cobb, while William Bendix and John Goodman played Ruth).

Mickey Cochrane: Star catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. He became the player-manager for the Tigers and helped the team to pennants in 1934 and 1935 before a severe beaning and emotional problems derailed his career.

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