Policing the Wild North-West: A Sociological Study of the Provincial Police in Alberta and Saskatchewan, 1905-32

By Zhiqiu Lin | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CONCLUSION: THE
RETURN OF THE RCMP

“Instead of being the end, it is the start of a new beginning.” APP Acting
Commissioner Hancock, 19321

The enforcement of the unpopular prohibition legislation was detrimen tal to the professional image of both provincial police forces. However, the legitimation crises did not ruin the police entirely. In fact, the forces gradually regained some popularity after the prohibition legislation was repealed in 1924. It was budgetary considerations that finally led the pro vincial governments to dissolve the provincial police and to re-employ the RCMP. The SPP and APP were disbanded in 1928 and 1932, respectively, after policing Alberta and Saskatchewan for more than a decade. The process of disbanding the police forces provided further evidence that the manifold police tasks were shaped directly by government policies and sometimes by individual politicians who happened to be in charge of the police.

Maintaining provincial police forces in Alberta and Saskatchewan was a large burden for the often meagre provincial coffers. Since the estab lishment of the provincial police forces in 1917, the expenses to sustain the forces had increased exponentially in both provinces.2 Soon after the establishment of the forces, both provincial governments recognized that the expenditure on policing could be curtailed as there was a federal police force the RCMP with more than a hundred policemen in each province, with relatively little work to perform. In fact, following the end of World War I, the RCMP were confined to the enforcement of a few federal statutes, such as the Inland Revenue Act, the Indian Act, and other acts exclusive of the Criminal Code.

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policing the Wild North-West: A Sociological Study of the Provincial Police in Alberta and Saskatchewan, 1905-32
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?