Human Remains: Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

By Jonathan Strauss | Go to book overview

FOUR
Death Comes Alive

Among the more remarkable aspects of the environmental approaches to public hygiene that arose in the early nineteenth century was their tendency to view pathogens as elements with an objective presence in the physical world. In the form of germ theory, this has become conventional wisdom in post-Pasteurian societies, but that should not numb us to the strangeness—in a strict sense—of this perspective, for it was a conception of health that went beyond not only the problems of the individual but also of the animal body itself to view illnesses as potentially independent agents, with their own, autonomous existence. Sickness, by such reckoning, was not merely an alien force, it was a localizable entity. And as hygienists increasingly identified the environmental causes of disease with miasmas, the latter assumed a more expansive significance in medical thinking. They started to be treated as a latent form of disease itself, a noxious agent that could infect material objects and then, under the right circumstances, transfer itself into living organisms. To theorize this noxiousness, hygienists focused on the processes of putrefaction and decomposition, which came to be understood in terms of life and

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Remains: Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Note on Translations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction- The Toxic Imagination 1
  • One - Medicine and Authority 16
  • Two - The Medical Uses of Nonsense 46
  • Three - A Hostile Environment 80
  • Four - Death Comes Alive 103
  • Five - Pleasure in Revolt 132
  • Six - Monsters and Artists 169
  • Seven - Abstracting Desire 221
  • Eight - What Abjection Means 258
  • Notes 283
  • Works Cited 359
  • Index 383
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 396

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.