Human Remains: Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris

By Jonathan Strauss | Go to book overview

INDEX
abjection, 14–15
artistic creation and, 279
arts of, 170–76
Céline, Louis-Ferdinand, 265–66
corpse and, 265–66
corpse as summum of abject, 272–73, 275
fear of abject, 276
of individual, 270–71
materiality of abject, 276–77
relations to deceased, 279
state and, 239–42
study of, 232–33
abomination laws of Leviticus, 232
Abraham, Karl, 230–33
abstract language, Hegel, 259
abstractions, 197, 260, 271
Académie de Médecine, 23, 27
Académie Royale de Médecine, 26
Ackernecht, Erwin, 111
Aesthetics (Hegel), 263–64
air, 90–94
air quality, 89, 90–91, 97
alienists, Bertrand and, 68
ambiguity of death, 13, 229
ammonia in fertilizer, human urine and, 153
anal eroticism, 230
anal libidinization, 230
anal stimulation, 230–31
anality and fantasm, 14
anatomists as crocheteurs (Sue), 9
anatomizing as hobby, 4
anatomy study, Jean Joseph Sue on, 8
animal life, 111–12
animals, 120, 124-25, 133-34
animation, 114, 135
Annales d’hygiène publique et de médecine legale (Annals of Public Hygiene and Legal Medicine), 27, 84-85
annihilation, intellect as, 261–62
archives, Jules Michelet, 218
arguments, Bertrand, 74–75
Aries, Philippe, fertility of death, 135
Aristophanes, Flaubert reading, 209–10
Artaud, Antonin, 266–67
artists, death and, 13–14
Assemblée Nationale Constituante, public health, 84-85
Aulagnier, Piera, fantasm, 238
authority, medicine and, 9–10
autopsies, 78
Bachelard, Gaston, 7
Balzac, Henri
on artistic process, 201–2
La cousin Bette (Cousin Bette), 198-203
death, figure of literary creation, 198-203
funerals, 70
infection, 98
literary characters and abjection of the dead, 170
putrefaction and literary characters, 14
science and, 7
self-description, 201
Barthélemy, Marquis de, Legislation on the Insane and on Child Assistance, 49
Baudelaire, Charles, necrophilia, 171

-383-

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Human Remains: Medicine, Death, and Desire in Nineteenth-Century Paris
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Note on Translations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction- The Toxic Imagination 1
  • One - Medicine and Authority 16
  • Two - The Medical Uses of Nonsense 46
  • Three - A Hostile Environment 80
  • Four - Death Comes Alive 103
  • Five - Pleasure in Revolt 132
  • Six - Monsters and Artists 169
  • Seven - Abstracting Desire 221
  • Eight - What Abjection Means 258
  • Notes 283
  • Works Cited 359
  • Index 383
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