Lincoln and Leadership: Military, Political, and Religious Decision Making

By Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

Contributors

Allen C. Guelzo is the Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and Director of Civil War Studies at Gettysburg College. He is the author of numerous books treating subjects from Jonathan Edwards, to evangelical Christianity, to Lincoln and the Civil War era. Among his recent books are Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (Eerdmans, 1999), which won the Lincoln Prize for 2000; Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (Simon & Schuster, 2004), which won the Lincoln Prize for 2005; Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America (Simon & Schuster, 2008); Abraham Lincoln as a Man of Ideas (Southern Illinois University Press, 2009); and Lincoln: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Randall M. Miller is the William Dirk Warren ‘05 Sesquicentennial Chair and Professor of History at Saint Joseph’s University. He is author or editor of numerous books. Among his books related to the Civil War are, as coeditor, Religion and the American Civil War (Oxford University Press, 1998), and The Birth of the Grand Old Party: The Republicans’ First Generation (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002). His most recent book, coauthored with Paul Cimbala, is The Northern Home Front in the Civil War (Praeger, 2012).

Matthew Pinsker holds the Brian Pohanka Chair for Civil War History at Dickinson College. Among his many interests, he writes on political issues, personalities, and history. In Lincoln studies, he is best known for his highly acclaimed Lincoln’s Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers’ Home (Oxford University Press, 2003). He also wrote Abraham Lincoln (CQ Press, 2002) for the “American Presidents Reference Series.”

Harry S. Stout is the Jonathan Edwards Chair of American Religious History at Yale University. He is the author of several highly regarded books in American religious history. His interests in the Civil War have led to two important books, Upon the Altar of the Nation: A Moral History of the Civil War (Viking, 2006), and, as coeditor, Religion and the American Civil War (Oxford University Press, 1998).

Gregory J. W. Urwin is Professor of History at Temple University, Vice-President of the Society for Military History, and the General Editor of the “Campaigns and Commanders” series at the University of Oklahoma Press. Among his many much-respected works on military history, he has published Custer Victorious: The Civil War Battles of General George Armstrong Custer (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1983), and, as editor, Black Flag over Dixie: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in the Civil War (Southern Illinois University Press, 2004).

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Lincoln and Leadership: Military, Political, and Religious Decision Making
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The North's Civil War iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Lincoln and Leadership- An Introduction 1
  • 2 - Sowing the Wind and Reaping the Whirlwind Abraham Lincoln as a War President 39
  • 3 - Seeing Lincoln's Blind Memorandum 60
  • 4 - Abraham Lincoln as Moral Leader the Second Inaugural as America's Sermon to the World 78
  • 5 - Lincoln and Leadership- An Afterword 96
  • Notes 103
  • Bibliographical Essay 121
  • Contributors 131
  • Index 133
  • The North's Civil War 137
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