Loyalty to Loyalty: Josiah Royce and the Genuine Moral Life

By Mathew A. Foust | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My life so far has funded me with indelible impressions of both the preciousness and precariousness of loyalty. Long before I learned anything of Josiah Royce, experiences both joyous and miserable taught me well the need for loyalty in a meaningful life. I suspect that in this regard I am entirely ordinary. This book exists because loyalty matters— not just to me, not just to Royce—but to everyone.

I wish to acknowledge Helen Tartar, Thomas C. Lay, Kathleen A. Sweeney, Eric Newman, and Nicholas Frankovich of Fordham University Press. Each played a vital role in bringing this book to fruition and it is better because of them. I thank Emily Higgins for assistance related to the cover art.

I thank Scott L. Pratt, Naomi Zack, Mark Johnson, and Mary Jaeger for their loyal support and encouragement throughout the development of this manuscript and at various other times during my life as a graduate student. I thank John J. McDermott and Brenda Wirkus for the same. I also thank Catherine Burke, Brent Crouch, Kim Diaz, Kim Garchar, John Kaag, Melissa Shew, and Joseph J. Tanke, loyal friends and colleagues during and beyond our time together as classmates.

I thank my students, who continually provide me with opportunity for loyal service that is both rigorous and rewarding. Of especial note are Matt Jacobs, Claire Papas, Miles Raymer, Justin Wafer, Jessica Waring, and Mo Wernet, who in winter and spring 2010 joined me in Loyalty Club, a reading group devoted to Josiah Royce’s The Philosophy of Loyalty.

I thank Karen Fierman and Raymond Chang, loyal friends and neighbors from opposite corners of the globe. I thank John Delzoppo, Adam LaSota, and Mike Salamone, loyal friends and neighbors back home. I remember fondly the loyalty of Stella Salamone.

-xi-

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Loyalty to Loyalty: Josiah Royce and the Genuine Moral Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - The Treachery and Ambivalence of Loyalty 1
  • One - Loyalty, Justice, Virtue 10
  • Two - The Nature of Loyalty 26
  • Three - Loyalty to Loyalty 51
  • Four - Learning Loyalty 82
  • Five - Loyalty and Community 110
  • Six - Disloyalty 136
  • Seven - Loyalty, Disaster, Business- Contemporary Applications 157
  • Conclusion- The Need for Loyalty 169
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 209
  • American Philosophy 213
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