Loyalty to Loyalty: Josiah Royce and the Genuine Moral Life

By Mathew A. Foust | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION: THE NEED FOR LOYALTY

I have just discussed, in the previous chapter, two contemporary applications of Royce’s philosophy of loyalty, as I have presented and advocated it in this book. The problems addressed by these applications were first introduced in the introduction, and following all that has transpired since, I felt it appropriate to address them anew. These are surely not the only problems in which loyalty figures prominently. My hope is that what I have done in the way of clarifying the nature of loyalty and its place in the moral life can help to guide us through myriad moral perplexities surrounding loyalty or other moral perplexities in which loyalty occupies a prominent place.

I want to emphasize that adopting Royce’s philosophy of loyalty does not necessitate becoming an extraordinary moral hero, the likes of which I have perhaps described in the examples used in my discussions of loyalty for disaster and loyalty for business. Rather, Royce’s philosophy of loyalty simply necessitates that we be loyal and, insofar as it lies in our power, loyal to loyalty. We could stand more clarity, of course, with respect to “insofar as it lies in our power.” My plea to the reader is that

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Loyalty to Loyalty: Josiah Royce and the Genuine Moral Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - The Treachery and Ambivalence of Loyalty 1
  • One - Loyalty, Justice, Virtue 10
  • Two - The Nature of Loyalty 26
  • Three - Loyalty to Loyalty 51
  • Four - Learning Loyalty 82
  • Five - Loyalty and Community 110
  • Six - Disloyalty 136
  • Seven - Loyalty, Disaster, Business- Contemporary Applications 157
  • Conclusion- The Need for Loyalty 169
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 209
  • American Philosophy 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.