Nine Algorithms That Changed the Future: The Ingenious Ideas That Drive Today's Computers

By John Maccormick | Go to book overview

SOURCES AND FURTHER READING

As explained on page 8, this book does not use in-text citations. Instead, all sources are listed below, together with suggestions of further reading for those interested in finding out more about the great algorithms of computer science.

The epigraph is from Vannevar Bush’s essay “As We May Think,” originally published in the July 1945 issue of The Atlantic magazine.

Introduction (chapter 1). For some accessible, enlightening explanations of algorithms and other computer technology, I recommend Chris Bishop’s 2008 Royal Institution Christmas lectures, videos of which are freely available online. The lectures assume no prior knowledge of computer science. A. K. Dewdney’s New Turing Omnibus usefully amplifies several of the topics covered in the present volume and introduces many more interesting computer science concepts—but some knowledge of computer programming is probably required to fully appreciate this book. Juraj Hromkovič’s Algorithmic Adventures is an excellent option for readers with a little mathematical background, but no knowledge of computer science. Among the many college-level computer science texts on algorithms, three particularly readable options are Algorithms, by Dasgupta, Papadimitriou, and Vazirani; Algorithmics: The Spirit of Computing, by Harel and Feldman; and Introduction to Algorithms, by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein.

Search engine indexing (chapter 2). The original AltaVista patent covering the metaword trick is U.S. patent 6105019, “Constrained Searching of an Index,” by Mike Burrows (2000). For readers with a computer science background, Search Engines: Information Retrieval in Practice, by Croft, Metzler, and Strohman, is a good option for learning more about indexing and many other aspects of search engines.

PageRank (chapter 3). The opening quotation by Larry Page is taken from an interview by Ben Elgin, published in Businessweek, May 3, 2004. Vannevar Bush’s “As We May Think” was, as mentioned above, originally published in The Atlantic magazine (July 1945). Bishop’s lectures (see above) contain an elegant demonstration of PageRank using a system of water pipes

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