The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left

By Landon R. Y Storrson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many individuals and institutions assisted me in the long process of researching and writing this book. For fellowships, leaves from teaching, and travel grants I thank the American Council of Learned Societies, the Harry S. Truman Library Institute, and, at the University of Houston, the Department of History, Women’s Studies Program and College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. Among the dozens of archivists without whom I would not have gotten far, I am especially grateful to Fred Romanski, Herb Rawlings-Milton, Ed Schamel, Rodney Ross, and Jessie Kratz at the National Archives; Dennis Bilger, Randy Sowell, David Clark, and Liz Safly at the Harry S. Truman Library; John White at the College of Charleston Library; David Kessler at the Bancroft Library, University of California; David Klaassen at the Social Welfare History Archive, University of Minnesota; and Harry Miller at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The Arnold & Porter law firm kindly permitted me to examine loyalty hearing transcripts and other nonprivileged files from the firm’s archives. Lisa Hazirjian, Katarina Keane, and Mary Klatt provided excellent research services in remote archives. Scholars who sent me helpful documents include Svetlana Chervonnaya, Ruth Fairbanks, Paul Rosier, David Shreve, and Nancy Beck Young. John Earl Haynes graciously checked some names for me in his database on the Communist Party USA.

Relatives and acquaintances of former loyalty defendants provided documents, photographs, and insights. Arthur Goldschmidt Jr. and Ann Goldschmidt Richardson shared many details, in addition to photos and the electronic version of their father’s draft memoirs. Gene Cohen Tweraser and Karen Cohen Holmes gave me many leads on their parents and also put me in touch with the late Charlotte Tuttle Lloyd Walkup, who kindly spoke with me about her experiences as a government lawyer and with the federal loyalty program. Nancy Kramer Bickel sent me photos that she gathered in the process of making a fine documentary about her aunt: A Twentieth Century Woman: Lucy Kramer Cohen (2011). Louisa Lloyd Hurley and Bruce Cohen also shared photographs. For perspectives on Leon and Mary Dublin Keyserling, I am deeply indebted to her brother the late Thomas D. Dublin, her nephew Thomas Dublin, Kathryn Kish Sklar, Sally Dublin Slenczka, and Harriet

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.