Unlocking the Gates: How and Why Leading Universities Are Opening Up Access to Their Courses

By Taylor Walsh | Go to book overview

4
DIGITAL PEDAGOGY: CARNEGIE MELLON’S
OPEN LEARNING INITIATIVE

The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) represents Carnegie Mellon University’s distinctive approach to open online education. The project’s first grant proposal to the Hewlett Foundation opens by stating an ambitious premise: “Carnegie Mellon is working to help the World Wide Web make good on its promise of vastly accessible and highly effective online education.”1 Building on Carnegie Mellon’s past experiments with the use of information technology to improve educational efficiency and effectiveness, the initiative’s 14 introductory courses provide users with self-contained rich online environments that profess to guide users—with the aid of interactive examples, embedded assessments, virtual labs, and constant feedback—toward the same learning outcomes as enrolled students taking the equivalent courses in person.2

The OLI seeks to expand access to instruction as well as to content. Rather than simply publishing professors’ static teaching materials, as many other online courseware initiatives do, the OLI asks faculty to work with a team of experts to completely redesign their courses for web-based delivery. This interdisciplinary approach draws on Carnegie Mellon’s institutional strengths in instructional

1“Four Courses, Millions of Users: Creating a New Paradigm for Online Education: A Proposal from Carnegie Mellon University to The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.” February 22, 2002, 2.

2Though heavily reliant on funding from the Hewlett Foundation, some of the courses in the OLI were direct beneficiaries of earlier experiments with technology in teaching that predate Hewlett’s involvement in this space, such as those conducted through the Pew Charitable Trust’s Program on Course Redesign (PRC) and the Mellon Foundation’s Cost-Effective Uses of Technology in Teaching (CEUTT) program.

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unlocking the Gates: How and Why Leading Universities Are Opening Up Access to Their Courses
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.