The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
WORK AREA RECOVERY PLAN
Getting the Office Up and Running

Ya gots to work with what you gots to work with.

— Stevie Wonder


INTRODUCTION
Work area recovery means preparing workspace in which to temporarily recover business operations. It usually involves offices, but it could easily encompass call centers, retail space, or factories. Whatever its function, a plan is needed to establish a place for people to work. Every day that your business is out of service is another day where:
Your competitors’ sales force is active while yours is idle.
Bills are not sent to customers nor is there a place to receive funds.
Bills are not paid and potentially become overdue.
Customer orders are not received or processed, potentially leading to cancellation.

Some companies focus exclusively on recovering their IT operations and never think about applying the same effort to the people who are to use the IT services. Recovering one without the other will not restore service to your customers. Office space will not be recovered within the RTO without a tested plan.

This plan enables key personnel (such as the sales force and the tech support call center) to work during a disruptive event. Creating and testing this plan demonstrates corporate responsibility while simultaneously protecting your business reputation. A plan that promptly restores service minimizes the disruption of revenue and also protects customer relationships.

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