The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
PANDEMIC PLAN

Epidemics have often been more influential than statesmen and
soldiers in shaping the course of political history,
and diseases may also color the moods of civilizations
.

—Anonymous


INTRODUCTION

Up to this point, every plan has been based on an incident that adversely affected the operation of a company process—or even the company itself. These events triggered activation of the incident response plan. With work and a bit of luck, the incident’s impact was quickly minimized and the company moved on.

A pandemic requires a very different type of plan. It fits under business continuity planning as a disruption of the flow of business. Unlike the sharp suddenness of a disaster, a pandemic may appear gradually and then run for several months or even years. The disease follows its favorite season around the globe and ends up again on your doorstep—often more virulent than before.

A pandemic refers to an infectious disease that is spread by contact with people. Therefore, minimizing contact with people is essential. This might be between employees, as well as between employees and customers. For some businesses, this is not a problem. For others that depend on face-to-face customer contact, it requires a well-considered plan to minimize contact and to sanitize areas.

A pandemic affects more than people. It can change the demand for the goods and services offered by your company. If your services are offered person to person, it might reduce demand, as people seek to minimize personal contact. Are your products something that are used as people interact? Are they something used at home where people may shelter their families from others? Do your products provide something to ease the pandemic such as improved personal sanitation or face masks?

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.