The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER 14
ELECTRICAL SERVICE
Keeping the Juice Flowing

Nothing shocks me. I’m a scientist.
Harrison Ford, as Indiana Jones


INTRODUCTION

This chapter is provided so you will have a basic understanding of electrical power support for your critical equipment. Use the information as a background when talking to your facility electrical engineer and your UPS supplier. While you’ll not want to work on high-voltage circuits or equipment yourself (leave that to trained professionals), an overall knowledge of how your electrical systems work will help you to write a better plan.


ELECTRICAL SERVICE

Imagine a business in which if you create too much product it is immediately lost forever. A business where people only pay for what they use, but demand that all they want be instantly available at any time. A product they use in varying amounts throughout the day. A product that requires an immense capital investment but is sold in pennies per unit. Welcome to the world of electricity. Electrical service is so reliable, so common, that people take it for granted that it will always be there whenever they want it. Electricity is an essential part of our everyday existence. Few businesses could run for a single minute without it.

Side-stepping the issue of the huge effort of the electric company to ensure uninterrupted service, let’s consider the impact of electricity on our business. Without a reliable, clean source of electric power, all business stops. We have all experienced an electrical blackout at some point. When we add together how

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