The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
AND NETWORKING
Your Connection to the World

Everything is connected… no one thing can change by itself.
— Paul Hawken


INTRODUCTION

All of us are becoming more interconnected, as people and companies make increasing use of telecommunications networks to connect to suppliers, customers, business associates, and friends. Telecommunications has enabled our businesses and personal lives to be “just-in-time” no matter where we might be in the world. We use telecommunications networks to talk, share data, run applications, download files, organize schedules, exchange e-mail, and access the Internet. We use these networks to connect us with our coworkers and to collaborate with customers in doing the business of the firm. This chapter reviews the dangers that threaten our telecommunications networks and the attributes unique to these networks that require special processes to restore them after a disaster.

Most organizations have two distinct telecommunications networks: one for voice communication that uses the standard telephone system (also known as the public switched telephone network, or PSTN) and another for all electronic communication that uses one or more computer networks that are typically connected to the Internet. While the need for two distinct networks is slowly changing with the increasing use of VoIP (Voice-over-Internet Protocol) for sending voice communications over the Internet, many organizations will have to maintain both for the foreseeable future. Fortunately for our planning purposes, both types of networks have very similar issues that affect disaster recovery

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