The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 22
HUMAN RESOURCES
Your Most Valuable Asset

You win with people.

—Woody Hayes


INTRODUCTION

Your Human Resources department has an important role to play in business continuity planning. Major business emergencies are very stressful events. From a business perspective, stress reduces the productivity of the work force. The Human Resources department ensures that the “people side” of an emergency is addressed for the best long-term benefit of the company. The staff can also take steps to ensure that the essential human needs of the work force are addressed so that they are ready to resume work as soon as the problems at hand are addressed. In manufacturing jargon, the Human Resources specialists are the “human machinists” who maintain the “people” machines.

Employees spend a great deal of their life at work. Their workplace becomes a separate community for them, paralleling the one at home. They make friends, celebrate life’s milestones, and develop an identity with those around them. When this is properly cultivated by the company, the employees become more productive. If this aspect is ignored by the company, then this can turn negative and become a drag on employee efforts. Business continuity planning for Human Resources works to address the employee concerns during a crisis to minimize the negative impacts and position the work force for a successful recovery.

Most Human Resources departments already have in place approved procedures to handle some of the things addressed here. These processes should be incorporated into the plan insofar as they touch on business continuity planning.

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