The Inner Life of Empires: An Eighteenth-Century History

By Emma Rothschild | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book began with the Tanner Lectures on Human Values that I gave at Princeton University in April 2006, and I am grateful to Anthony Appiah, Steven Macedo, and the Tanner Committee for the invitation to give the lectures, to Jan Logan, to Dipesh Chakrabarty, Susan James, Fania Oz-Sulzberger, and Kathleen Wilson for exceptionally interesting comments, and to Jeremy Adelman, Hendrik Hartog, and Daniel Rodgers. Several friends have read the manuscript, and I am immensely grateful to Victoria Rothschild, Indrani Sen, Amartya Sen, Sunil Amrith, Shane Bobrycki, Johnny Grimond, Walter Johnson, Brigitta van Rheinberg, Charles Rosenberg, David Todd, and two reviewers for Princeton University Press for comments. I am most grateful to Sir Raymond and Lady Johnstone and to Lady Erskine-Hill for many conversations about the eighteenth-century Johnstones. I would like to thank Sunil Amrith, Caitlin Anderson, Bernard Bailyn, Chris Bayly, Sugata Bose, John Cairns, David Cannadine, Sophie Cartwright, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Linda Colley, Robert Darnton, Barun De, Philip Fisher, Durba Ghosh, Anthony Grafton, the late Simon Gray, Ranajit Guha, Hendrik Hartog, Walter Johnson, Colin Kidd, Philipp Lehmann, Susan Manning, Gabriel Paquette, Nicholas Phillipson, Bhavani Raman, Lisbet Rausing, Daniel Rodgers, Charles Rosenberg, Victoria Roths child, Elaine Scarry, Indrani Sen, Amartya Sen, Gareth Stedman Jones, Julia Stephens, David Todd, and Robert Travers for many helpful conversations. Shane Bobrycki, Sophie Cartwright, Aditya Balasubramanian, Mary-Rose Cheadle, Rachel Coffey, Justine Crump, Leigh Denault, Geoff Grundy, Ian Kumekawa,

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The Inner Life of Empires: An Eighteenth-Century History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To Victoria v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - Ideas and Sentiments 1
  • Chapter One - Setting out 11
  • Chapter Two - Coming Home 59
  • Chapter Three - Ending and Loss 97
  • Chapter Four - Economic Lives 121
  • Chapter Five - Experiences of Empire 154
  • Chapter Six - What Is Enlightenment? 210
  • Chapter Seven - Histories of Sentiments 263
  • Chapter Eight - Other People 284
  • Acknowledgments 303
  • Appendix - Children of James Johnstone and Barbara Murray 307
  • Abbreviations 309
  • Notes 311
  • Index 469
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