Beyond UFOs: The Search for Extraterrestrial Life and Its Astonishing Implications for Our Future

By Jeffrey Bennett | Go to book overview

6
THE MAKINGS OF A TRULY
GREAT PLANET

A Rock, A River, A Tree
Hosts to species long since departed
Marked the mastodon,
The dinosaur, who left dry tokens
Of their sojourn here
On our planet floor,
Any broad alarm of their hastening doom
Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages.

Maya Angelou, from “On the Pulse of the Morning”

You’ve probably heard this one: The reason our planet is so great for life is the extreme good fortune of our location in the solar system. If Earth moved just a mile closer to the Sun, we would all burn up, and if it moved just a mile farther away, the oceans would freeze. I’ve heard this claim from so many people—students, school teachers, friends, and even preachers—that it’s apparently attained the status of an urban legend.

It sounds pretty good, and like most urban legends it contains a kernel of truth: There must indeed be some distance from the Sun that would be too hot for life to survive on Earth, and some distance at which it would be too cold. But the distance isn’t a mile, nor even a few million miles, as you can realize just by thinking about Earth’s orbit around the Sun: Earth’s orbit is not a perfect circle, but rather is an ellipse (oval) in which our distance from the Sun varies from a minimum of about 91 million miles each January to a maximum of about 94 million miles each July. Thus, according to the urban legend, our whole planet would burn up each January and freeze each July. In reality, this 3-million-mile variation in distance has virtually no effect on the weather at all, a fact that becomes obvious when you remember that the northern hemisphere has

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond UFOs: The Search for Extraterrestrial Life and Its Astonishing Implications for Our Future
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Jeffrey Bennett ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface - Alien Dreams xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Worlds beyond Imagination 1
  • 2 - What Makes It Science? 22
  • 3 - What I Know about Aliens 41
  • 4 - What Is Life? 62
  • 5 - Betting Life Started 87
  • 6 - The Makings of a Truly Great Planet 111
  • 7 - Life in the Solar System 137
  • 8 - Life among the Stars 161
  • 9 - The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence 184
  • 10 - Where Is Everybody? 197
  • To Learn More 207
  • Afterword to the Paperback Edition 209
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.