A King Travels: Festive Traditions in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain

By Teofilo F. Ruiz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
The Meaning of Festivals: A Typology

IN 1559, Philip II sent his aposentador (head of household) to Toledo to make preparations for his first formal entry into the city as king and for the entry of his new wife, Isabelle of Valois, one year later1 Similarly, towards the end of 1584 and in the opening days of the next year, Philip II put into motion preparations for his forthcoming long journey through his eastern kingdoms. His aposentador mayor, Don Diego de Espinoza, was sent to Zaragoza to make the royal palaces there fit for the king’s visit and to procure suitable accommodations for the high nobility and the royal counselors “according to the social standing (estado) of each one.”2 Around the same time, the alcalde (a judicial and administrative officer) Valladares, “one of the four judges in the king’s household and court,” was commanded to secure enough provisions for the king’s cortege as it traveled from Madrid to Zaragoza. This was done, as Henry Cock who meticulously chronicled this particular voyage and who deployed in his narrative the usual foreign pejorative representations of Spaniards explained, because “peasants in Spain were inclined to steal and deceive.”3 Simultaneously, Philip II requested that the Council of Aragon await the king’s arrival in Zaragoza, and that Aragonese, Catalan, and Valencian grandees make plans to attend a general gathering at the Cortes at Monzón4 More than a century before, midfifteenth-century chronicles describing the fabulous feasts held in Valladolid in 1428 noted with great elation that the artificial castle built for the pas d’armes hosted by the Infante Don Enrique was the work of an Italian craftsman and cost the extravagant sum of between 12,000 and 15,000 gold florins5

1 Gómez de Castro, Recibimiento que… Toledo hizo á la reina Doña Isabel, 26. Carlota Fernández Travieso, the editor of Gómez de Castro’s Recibimiento shows how the costs of the feast were paid by either the city or civic organizations: “The great artificial arch at the gate of Bisagra was paid by Toledo’s city council; the arch at he gate of Forgiveness (Perdón) by the cathedral chapter, and the arch at the entrance to the square at Zocodover by the silk guild.” See also Horozco, Relaciones históricas toledanas, 181.

2 Cock, Relación del viaje hecho (1585), 9. See chapter 5.

3 Ibid., 9. I also explore these pejorative references to conditions in Spain in chapter 5.

4 Idem. The events in Zaragoza and Monzón are described in chapter

5 See Alvar García de Santa María, Crónica de Juan II de Castilla in Colección de documentos inéditos para la historia de España, vols. IC and C (Madrid: Real Academia de la Historia, 1891): C, 16. See also my “Festivités, couleurs et symboles du povouir en Castille au XVe siècle. Les celebrations de Mai 1428,” Annales. E.C.S. (1991), 530.

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A King Travels: Festive Traditions in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 356

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.