A King Travels: Festive Traditions in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain

By Teofilo F. Ruiz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
A King Goes Traveling: Philip II in the
Crown of Aragon, 1585–86 and 1592

ON Tuesday November 17, 1592, Philip II, already tormented by severe attacks of gout, arrived at the famous monastery of Irache in the middle of a fierce snowstorm.1 After a light collation, a visit to the monastery, and a quick glance at the many relics stored there, the king proceeded to Estella, one of the kingdom of Navarre’s most important cities, a mere quarter of a league away. Outside the gate, he was met by the city officials who, carrying a ceremonial palio to cover the king, brought him into the city with great solemnity. The civic authorities were dressed in long, red-velvet robes, reaching to their feet, as was “the custom of the land.”2 The king was led to his lodgings where, in a small square facing his residence, a large fictitious serpent or dragon spewed fire and flames from its mouth and the inevitable fountain poured wine for all passersby. The gate through which the king entered the city had been built anew just for this purpose, but the incessant snow and rain—and Cock’s truncated narrative—would have made the entire entry into Estella a very sorry affair, were it not that the ceremonial reception included a palio, something that Philip did not always get on his travels outside Castile.3 Although some elements of Philip’s royal entry are easily recognizable—the reception outside the walls, the palio, the civic authorities’ long, red-velvet robes, the ubiquitous dragon and wine fountain—the spirit (and description) of the event appear quite removed from those earlier dramatic entries we have witnessed in previous chapters. Past were those halcyon days when Philip had entered Salamanca for his first wedding, or Benavente on his way to England. Very much like the realms he ruled, ceremonies were now muted not only by the weather but also by the malaise spreading throughout Spain.

1 On the monastery of Irache and its geographical location, see the documents and introduction in José Ma. Lacarra et al., eds., Colección diplomática de Irache (Pamplona: Principe de Viana, 1986), 2 vols.

2 Cock, Jornada de Tarazona (1592). We have another eyewitness account of this voyage, written by Jehan Lhermite. I will compare the two accounts throughout my discussion of Philip’s voyage to Tarazona below.

3 Cock, Jornada de Tarazona, 62–64.

-146-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A King Travels: Festive Traditions in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 356

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.