The AMA Handbook of Project Management

By Paul C. Dinsmore; Jeannette Cabanis-Brewin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Project Cost Management in Practice

PAUL LOMBARD, PMP, CQM; PM COLLEGE

A Project Team for a major national retail products company was given the scope for a large new production facility and asked to prepare an estimate of the cost to build it. The completed estimate was presented to management, whose members informed the team that they already had a budget figure in mind and the team’s estimate was much too high. The project team reexamined the scope, used a second estimating process, and validated their original estimate. Once again, the team presented the estimate to Management but, once again, Management disagreed, even blaming the estimator and alleging that the team was “gold plating” the work. So, the two sides made an agreement to cut the scope of the facility to bring it into alignment with the team’s cost estimate. Unfortunately, the reduced scope was later determined to be unworkable; the smaller building was not large enough to accommodate the size of machine that would be inside of it. Ultimately, a Management decided to add the original scope back into the plan, but not to increase funding. In the end, results were that the project team did a great job on time and scope delivery but had major cost overruns. The project cost result was 40 percent higher than management’s budget for the project but almost exactly the initial cost estimate provided by the project team.1

This kind of story is, regrettably, repeated many times over in organizations around the world. Project cost management is so easy, and yet so hard. Project cost management affects many aspects of project work and is affected by factors within and outside the subject project. An important first step in dealing with these factors is to have an effective cost management system on your project. Unfortunately, no one correct process exists for managing costs, so it is more effective to speak in terms of the

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The AMA Handbook of Project Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 521

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.