The Princeton Guide to Ecology

By Simon A. Levin | Go to book overview

V.6
Conservation and Global
Climate Change
Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross
OUTLINE
1. Introduction
2. How climate is changing
3. Environmental responses to climate change
4. Consequences of climate change for conservation
5. The missing links

One of the most challenging issues for conservation during the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly apparent that the climate is changing because of human activities—the chemical composition of the atmosphere has been modified, record-breaking temperatures are becoming more common on an annual basis, and polar ice caps are melting. Ecosystems will respond to these changes in a variety of ways; some may be deemed beneficial and others detrimental. The question for ecologists and conservationists then becomes how do we conserve ecosystems, ecological processes, and species under conditions of a changing climate?


GLOSSARY

assisted migration. Directed dispersal or translocation of organisms across the landscape

bioclimatic envelope models. Models that use statistical methods to correlate species occurrences with environmental predictor variables to define a species’ environmental niche and predict the species’ occurrence across a broader landscape

greenhouse gases (GHGs). Gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, tropospheric ozone, or chloroflorocarbons that absorb solar radiation and reflect it back down to earth, creating a “greenhouse effect” that warms the earth’s surface

interannual. Between years

lake turnover. The mixing of deep anoxic (oxygenpoor) and shallow oxygen-rich water in lakes that occurs in fall and spring when water hits the threshold temperature of 4°C

oceanic conveyor belt. Ocean circulation pattern driven by temperature and salinity gradients across the globe that moves warm and cold water around the globe, moderating temperatures and salinity patterns

phenological changes. Timing of life cycle events that are related to seasonality of the organism such as hibernation, bud burst, flowering, egg laying, etc.

Quaternary period. The geologic time period beginning roughly 1.8 million years before present

stepping stones. Small, unconnected portions of suitable habitat that an organism uses to move from one place to another

trophic cascades. Changes at one level of the food chain that percolate through many other levels of the food chain, causing both direct and indirect effects on species composition

vagility. An organism’s ability to move through the landscape


1. INTRODUCTION

In this chapter, we describe how climate is changing, including both paleoclimatic and anthropogenic changes. We then discuss how the Earth is responding, both from an abiotic perspective (including atmospheric changes, temperature fluctuations, and ocean circulation patterns) and from the perspective of biotic communities. We describe some of the research approaches that have been used to examine and anticipate the types of responses of ecological communities to climate change and how scientists might prioritize and manage areas for conservation under conditions of a changing climate. Finally, we end with a discussion of

-557-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Princeton Guide to Ecology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 810

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.