Captives and Corsairs: France and Slavery in the Early Modern Mediterranean

By Gillian Weiss | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Colonial and postcolonial Algeria continues to haunt French domestic affairs. Crisis in the banlieues (suburbs), a disputed law about textbooks, and debates about headscarves all manifest the nation’s unease with addressing discrimination, acknowledging violence, and accommodating diversity born of a nineteenth- and twentieth-century past. The previous chapters have suggested that understanding the relationship between North Africa and France, in fact, requires a longer lens—back to the early modern period, and toward a shared history of galleys and bagnes, captives and corsairs.

For about two hundred years Mediterranean slavery was a reciprocal, religiously justified reality. It made tens of thousands of French Christians and North African Muslims into coerced laborers and speculative investments—with horrific personal, familial, and social consequences. During that period and for much longer, Mediterranean slavery was also a figment of the French imagination. It inspired fears and aspirations—about subjection and domination, defilement and decontamination—which friars, kings, consuls, and emperors drew on first to foster sovereign allegiance and then to defend territorial expansion.

From the sixteenth century onward, targeting particular captives from coastal areas, ransom efforts sought primarily to avert plague, sodomy, and apostasy and to establish attachment to France. After the mid-seventeenth century, targeting all French (and some foreign) Catholics, deliverance by salvo also attempted to demonstrate resolve against heretics and infidels, buttressing the monarch’s reputation as protector of Latin Christendom and establishing a link between Frenchness, faith, and freedom. By the Revolution, targeting new nationals, diplomacy backed by force served as a tool for the secular goal of regeneration, personal and political. Turning foreign captives into loyal Frenchmen, while asserting dominion over not just contiguous provinces but also in

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Captives and Corsairs: France and Slavery in the Early Modern Mediterranean
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on the Text xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One- Mediterranean Slavery 7
  • Chapter Two- Salvation without the State 27
  • Chapter Three- Manumission and Absolute Monarchy 52
  • Chapter Four- Bombarding Barbary 72
  • Chapter Five- Emancipation in An Age of Enlightenment 92
  • Chapter Six- Liberation and Empire from the Revolution to Napoleon 118
  • Chapter Seven- North African Servitude in Black and White 131
  • Chapter Eight- The Conquest of Algiers 156
  • Conclusion 170
  • Reference Matter 173
  • Abbreviations 175
  • Appendix 1- Slave Numbers 179
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 325
  • Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 389

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.