From Deficit to Deluge: The Origins of the French Revolution

By Thomas E. Kaiser; Dale K. Van Kley | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. For example, John Hardman, French Politics, 1774–1789: From the Accession of Louis XVI to the Fall of the Bastille (London, 1995); and Munro Price, The Road from Versailles: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, and the Fall of the French Monarchy (New York, 2002).

2. François Furet, “La Révolution française est terminée,” and “Tocqueville et le problème de la Révolution française,” in Penser la Révolution française (Paris, 1978), 13–129, 209–56; and Alexis de Tocqueville, L’ancien régime et la Révolution, in Oeuvres complètes, ed. J.-P. Mayer (Paris, 1951–1991), vol. 2, part 1. Another French historian who adopts this view is Marcel Gauchet in La Révolution des droits de l’ homme (Paris, 1989). The notion that 1789 emerged out of a political void interestingly parallels the argument regarding the origins of the Terror put forward by Jean-Clément Martin in Violence et révolution: essai sur la naissance d’un mythe national (Paris, 2006). In light of the immense bibliography on the origins of the French Revolution, it is possible here as elsewhere in this introduction to cite only one or a small number of relevant works. Other primary and secondary sources are cited in the chapters in this volume devoted to specific aspects of the problem.

3. William Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 3rd ed. (Oxford, 1999), 110, 148, 194.

4. Keith Michael Baker, “Enlightenment Idioms, Old Regime Discourses, and Revolutionary Improvisation,” in this volume.

5. Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, 3rd ed., in Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Selected Works (New York, 1968), 97.

6. The standard but somewhat dated account is Jean Egret, La Pré-révolution française, 1787–1788 (Paris, 1961).

7. Lynn Hunt, Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (Berkeley, Calif., 1984), 56. On the raising of political consciousness before 1789, see Vivian R. Gruder, The Notables and the Nation: The Political Schooling of the French, 1787–1788 (Cambridge, Mass., 2007).

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