America's Corporate Art: The Studio Authorship of Hollywood Motion Pictures

By Jerome Christensen | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Fortune, December 1932, in The American Film Industry, ed. Tino Balio, rev. ed. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1979), pp. 318-19. This source hereafter will be cited in the text as AFI.

2. See Morton J. Horowitz, The Transformation of American Law, 1870–1960 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 69-70.

3. John Sedgwick and Michael Pokorny, “The Risk Environment of Film Making: Warner Bros. in the Inter-War Years,” Explorations in Economic History 35, no. 2 (1998): 196–97.

4. Leo Rosten, Hollywood: The Movie Colony, the Movie Makers (New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1941), pp. 81-82. This source hereafter will be cited in the text as H.

5. See Jared Gardner, “Covered Wagons and Decalogues: Paramount’s Myths of Origins,” Yale Journal of Criticism 13, no. 2 (Fall 2000): 361-89; Paul Grainge, “Branding Hollywood: Studio Logos and the Aesthetics of Memory and Hype,” Screen 45, no. 4 (Winter 2004): 354-60.

6. Peter F. Drucker, The Concept of the Corporation (New York: John Day, 1946), pp. 8, 15, 7.

7. Roland Marchand, Creating the Corporate Soul: The Rise of Public Relations and Corporate Imagery in American Big Business (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), see esp. pp. 130-201.

8. Thurman Arnold, The Folklore of Capitalism (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1937), pp. 350-53.

9. Suman Gupta, Corporate Capitalism and Political Philosophy (London: Pluto Press, 1988), p. 102. This source hereafter will be cited in the text as CC.

10. Will Hays, See and Hear (1929; rpt., New York: Arno Press, 1970), p. 4.

11. For a splendid account of this theoretical spectrum see Robert Spadino, “Geniuses of the System: Authorship and Evidence in Classical Hollywood Cinema,” Auteurism Revisited, Film History 7, no. 4 (Winter 1995): 362-85. Spadino begins with a judicious response to Thomas Schatz’s groundbreaking study of Irving Thalberg’s authorship at MGM in The Genius of the System: Hollywood Filmmaking in the Studio Era (New York: Pantheon Books, 1988); he then gives an enlightening account of both the power and constraints of the formalist paradigm elaborated in David Bordwell, Janet Staiger, and Kristin Thompson, The Classical Hollywood Cinema (New York: Columbia University

-341-

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