Money Games: Profiting from the Convergence of Sports and Entertainment

By David M. Carter | Go to book overview

Part III
AT-VENUE CONVERGENCE

Over time, “at-venue” convergence has proven to be one of the most difficult areas in sports to profit from, yet it has become, and is poised to remain, among the most important revenue drivers in the sports industry.

Historically, stadiums and arenas were built solely so fans could attend sporting and entertainment events, by providing them “a place to go and watch a game.” However, in our modern technological world, this is not enough, as fans demand an experiential outing, a convenient and complete game-day experience that transforms mere games into memorable sporting events. By enhancing the fan experience with just the right mix of sports and entertainment, and delivering the optimal blend of marketing and promotion, those that invest in, manage, or own venues can prosper.

The history of the sports venue development originated in ancient Greece with the emergence of venues including the Stadium of Athens in 331 B.C., which was constructed for the ancient Olympics. Built by hollowing out a slope and constructing rows of seats in a traditional u-shape, semi-circular at one end while open at the other, the stadium had a seating capacity of about fifty thousand.

However, because they lacked a ticketing system, the Greeks missed the opportunity to fully monetize the events—an opportunity the Romans would take advantage of four hundred years later with their famed Coliseum and Circus Maximus. These venues were used for a broader set of contests and featured various levels of seating arrangements, including placing the emperor and his entourage in the best seats, a precursor to today’s luxury suites. In addition to this preferred seating, these wide-ranging contests brought with them diverse audiences that created a market for myriad merchants who sold crafts and souvenirs in the Coliseum concourses.

By the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and during a period

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Money Games: Profiting from the Convergence of Sports and Entertainment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.