Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service

By Mimi Clark Gronlund | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Forging the Steel

I cannot say, and I will not say
That he is dead.—He is just away!

James Whitcomb Riley, “Away”

ALTHOUGH OIL’S REIGN WAS CLOSE AT HAND, cotton was still king when my parents married in 1924. Texas produced a third of the nation’s crop, and Dallas enjoyed a growing prosperity as a major cotton center with an international reputation.1 Recreational activities thrived in the healthy economy—so much so that the city found it necessary to hire a full-time dance hall inspector. Radio, live theater, and sports were also favorite forms of entertainment, but movies were the number one popular pastime, with four theaters located on a single block of downtown Elm Street.

My parents had little cash to spend on such diversions during the first year of their marriage. My father sometimes joked that he married Mother for her money—her wealth consisting of a four-dollar check received each month as her share of a life insurance policy taken out on her brother Sam, who died during World War I. My father’s only assured income was a five-dollar-a-week retainer that he received from a black client who ran a barbecue stand. He and Mother collected the money each Saturday, and afterward used it for their weekly grocery shopping. They did manage to buy a used Model T Ford from Bill Clark and a small but comfortable cottage located in a section considered “the wrong side of the tracks” in otherwise fashionable Highland Park. The house was furnished with an assortment of family donations and miscellaneous pieces received as payment for legal services. My father accepted numerous items from clients who were unable to pay their bills, and ultimately accumu-

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.