Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service

By Mimi Clark Gronlund | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 4
Turning Points

An opportunity to give the best of himself to something he
believed in.

Mary Clark Burchfield, 1935

CHANGE WAS THE HALL MARK OF THE 1930s for Dallas. The decade began with an event that catapulted the city’s solid, cottonbased economy to unprecedented prosperity, bringing relief from the Depression to many Dallas citizens and incredible personal wealth to a few. The man who triggered the transformation was an audacious wildcatter named Columbus Marion (“Dad”) Joiner. He would have an important impact on the life of Tom Clark.

Wildcatters—men who drilled for oil, often without supporting scientific data or adequate financial backing—were an unconventional bunch, and Dad Joiner was as colorful a character as any of those drawn to this wildly speculative enterprise. He had made and lost at least two fortunes by the time he came to Texas from Oklahoma in 1927. At seventy, Joiner was a cagey and charming dreamer whose voracious appetite for reading, though not obtained through formal education, had equipped him with a substantial assortment of biblical and Shakespearean quotations. Dad Joiner located his oil venture on the farm of Daisy Bradford, about a hundred miles east of Dallas in an area that most geologists had labeled a “hopeless case” for oil.1

By the end of the summer of 1930, after two previous drillings had ended in failure, Joiner was on his third well, the Daisy Bradford No. 3. At this point, Joiner’s money was running out, and to support his drillings, he had sold certificates of ownership to hundreds of people.2 The outlook was poor until September 1930, when signs appeared that a strike might be close at hand. The news spread quickly, and by the first of October, a

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?