Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service

By Mimi Clark Gronlund | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
His Greatest Mistake

I have made a lot of mistakes in my life, but one I acknowledge
publicly is my part in the evacuation of the Japanese from Califor-
nia in 1942.

Tom Clark, 1966

I WAS OUTSIDE PLAYING on that sunny, mild Sunday when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. My father was in San Francisco, and Mother was in the kitchen of our Beverly Hills home, listening to the radio. Our lives, like those of other Americans, were irrevocably changed. The government moved quickly to protect the country from internal sabotage. Attorney General Francis Biddle identified and designated “restricted” areas, where access was limited and controlled, and “prohibited” areas— ports, harbors, power plants, and other spots considered vulnerable to sabotage—where no access was allowed. He ordered all enemy aliens—that is, all Japanese, German, and Italian citizens—removed from these areas, and on December 11, the Los Angeles Times announced that the FBI had 2,300 in custody. People remained calm, and there was no immediate cry for action against Japanese American citizens.

On the West Coast, the army, under the leadership of Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt, the commander of the Fourth Army and the Western Defense Command, assumed responsibility for the area’s security. According to my father, President Roosevelt wanted an official civilian voice to balance the military’s authority in the handling of enemy aliens, and since the Department of Justice already had offices along the West Coast, it was assigned that task. In a memo to Attorney General Biddle written on January 17, 1942, Assistant Attorney General Thurman Arnold recommended that my father head the project:

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.