History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 3

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview
CONTENTS OF THE FOURTH YOLUME. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION IN FIVE EPOCHS.
III—AMERICA TAKES UP ARMS FOR SELF-DEFENCE AND ARRIVES AT INDEPENDENCE.
CHAPTER I.
AMERICA SUSTAINS THE TOWN OF BOSTON.
May 1774.
The American revolution. Its necessity. Its principle3
Most cherished in America. Britain should have offered independence4
Infatuation of the king and parliament. Port act received in Boston5
Meeting of nine committees. The tea not to be paid for6
Circular to the colonies. Boston town-meeting. Gage arrives7
His character. Firmness of Newburyport, Salem, and Boston8
New York Sons of Liberty propose a general congress9
Formation of a conservative party9
Effect of the port act in Connecticut and Providence10
New York committee of fifty-one10
The king approves two acts against Massachusetts. Philadelphia11
Dickinson’s measures12
New York and Connecticut plan a congress13
Hutchinson’s addressers13
Suppression of murmurs. The Massachusetts Legislature14
Patience of Boston14
Baltimore, the model. New Hampshire. New Jersey15
Sympathy of South Carolina for Boston. Virginia16
Its burgesses appoint a fast; are dissolved; hold a meeting17
Convention called in Virginia. North Carolina. Union of the country18
CHAPTER II.
PREPARATIONS FOR A GENERAL CONGRESS.
Jane-August 1774.
Blockade of Boston19
Effects elsewhere. The mandamus councillors20

-iii-

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