History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 5

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview
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HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE OF THE
UNITED STATES,
FROM THE REVOLUTION TO THE CIVIL WAR.

By JOHN BACH McASTER.

To be completed in five volumes. Volume I. Svo. Cloth, gilt top, 82.50.

“Heretofore the story of the nation’s inception and growth has been frequently described, but has never been made interesting. Mr. McMaster not only describes events and people with remarkable felicity, but has the power to lead the reader on from point to point, so that his pages have the swiftly-moving panoramic attraction which one feels in a railway-train, as it brings new scenes every moment to the eye.”—Boston Herald.

“It is a storehouse of facts concerning the life, feelings, and limitations of the people, attractively grouped, and stated with precision and masculine energy…. Bids fair to be the authoritative history of the United States for the period which it covers.”—The Nation.

“No one can linger long over this volume without perceiving that we have in it a fresh and valuable addition to our national literature, which calls for immediate recognition. The plan on which the work is constructed is similar to that of which the late lamented Mr. Green made such brilliant use in his ‘History of the English People.’… This truly admirable scheme promises to be carried out, if we may judge by this first volume, with an amplitude of research and thoroughness of scholarship which will give weight to the author’s views, and a vigor and picturesqueness of style which will give them currency.”—Boston Journal.

“His theme is an important one, and we congratulate him on his success. His style is interesting and lively, and he gives such a graphic picture of our forefathers that it is a pleasure to follow him. The author has one great quality, and that is the power to arrange his ideas and marshal his facts. It has rarely been our province to notice a book with so many excellences and so few defects.”—New York Herald.

“He carries out in a complete, vivid, and delightful way, his promise to describe the dress, the occupations, the amusements, the literary canons of the several epochs comprehended within the scope of his survey…. The cardinal qualities of style, lucidity, animation, and energy, are everywhere present. Seldom, indeed, has a book in which matter of substantial value has been so happily united to attractiveness of form been offered by an American author to his fellow-citizens.”—New York Sun.

“His work, if the succeeding volumes are of a piece with this, will not be merely the most instructive of American histories, but a valuable contribution to narrative literature. His subject all historians may envy him; his information indicates diligent and well-directed preparation; his style is always clear, often picturesque, and sometimes eloquent.”—New York World.

“The author, with well-chosen words, and in picturesque style, presents a succession of living pictures, showing us just how life went on day by day, how people occupied themselves, and what they thought. All this is real history. It makes fascinating reading. Not the first or the faintest shadow of dullness is to be found on any of these pages…. One great charm of the book consists in its artistic grouping of topics and of facts. The pictures explain and complete each other. There is a wonderful combination of colors, and of light and shade, the effect of which can be seen only by those who read and see the whole.”—The Churchman.

New York: D. APPLETON & CO., 1, 3, & 5 Bond Street.

-583-

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