History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 6

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview
Save to active project

COMPLETE IN SIX VOLUMES, OCTAVO.


HISTORY OF THE
UNITED STATES,
From the Discovery of the Continent. By GEORGE BANCROFT.
An entirely new edition, partly rewritten and
thoroughly revised.

The author has made extensive changes in the text, condensing in places, en-
larging in others, and carefully revising. It is practitally a new work, embody-
ing the results of the latest researches, and enjoying the advantage of the author’s
long and mature experience
,

The original octavo edition was in twelve volumes. The present edition is complete in six volumes, octavo, the price being correspondingly reduced.


EXTRACTS FROM REVIEWS.

“The merits of Bancroft’s ‘History of the United States’ are so well known that little need be said of the new edition, the first volume of which, reaching to 1688, has just been published in very handsome form, except to point out the changes since the revision of 1876. One of the most prominent is the introduction of a division into three parts, beginning; respectively at 1492, 1660, and 1688. With each part begins a new numbering of the chapters, and the difference thus created between the editions is increased by the frequent separation of one chapter into two or three. Thus what was chapter two in 1876 becomes chapters two, three, and four, in 1883, and what was chapter twenty-two becomes chapters twelve, thirteen, and fourteen, of part second. In all, instead of twenty-seven chapters there are thirty-eight. The total length is not increased, but rather diminished, since there are many missions, for instance, of Captain John Smith’s apocryphal adventures in Hungary, the evidence for which, coming solely from the hero himself, probably seems weaker than ever to Mr. Bancroft. Among passages which will not be missed is this about the Quaker martyrs: ‘They were like those weeds which were unsightly to the eyes, and which only when trampled give out precious perfumes.’ Another expunged remark is that Episcopalianism ‘separating itself from Protestantism could acknowledge no equal except the Orthodox Greek Church and that of Rome.’ With these sentences have been rejected many whose meaning was given in the context, such curtailment being especially common at the beginning and end of chapters. The account of the character of James I is greatly abridged, and made somewhat less severe. In the place of the charge that Oliver Cromwell’s ruling motive was ambition, is the acknowledgment that in his foreign policy he was most certainly faithful to the interests of England. The notice of Luther is rewritten and enlarged, mainly by apt quotations of his own words. There has been less change in the accounts of American than of European matters, but the most important addition, anywhere, is that of two pages describing and praising Captain Smith’s government of Virginia. Often, when there appears to be an addition or omission, there is in reality only a transposition. The whole class of changes may be attributed to greater maturity of judgment, rather than to discovery of new material.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 490

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.