History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 6

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.
THE TREASURY ENTER A MINUTE FOR AN AMERICAN STAMP–TAX.
MINISTRY OF GRENVILLE.

MAY–SEPTEMBER 1763.

THE savage warfare was relentlessly raging when, in May and June, the young statesman, to whom the forms of office had referred the subject of the colonies, was devising plans for organizing governments in the newly acquired territories. Of an Irish family, and an Irish as well as an English peer, Shelburne naturally inclined to limit the legislative authority of the parliament of Groat Britain over the outlying dominions of the crown. The world gave him credit for great abilities; and, except the lawyers who had been raised to the peerage, ho was the best speaker in the house of lords.

For the eastern boundary of New England, Shelburne hesitated between the Penobscot and the St. Croix; on the north-east, he adopted the crest of the water-shed dividing the streams tributary to the St. Lawrence river from those flowing into the Bay of Fundy, or the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of St. Lawrence, south of Capo Rosières, designating the line on a map, which is still preserved. At the south, the boundary of Georgia was extended to its present limit.

Of Canada, General Murray proposed to make a military colony, and to include within it the lands on the Ohio and the lakes, in order to overawe the older colonies. Shelburne, in a more liberal spirit, desired to restrict that province by a line drawn from the intersection of the parallel of forty-five degrees north with the St. Lawrence to the east end of Lake Nipising. This advice was rejected by Egremont, who insisted on a plan like that of Murray; but Shelburne enforced his

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