The Constrained Court: Law, Politics, and the Decisions Justices Make

By Michael A. Bailey; Forrest Maltzman | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Abraham, Henry J. 1999. Justices, Presidents and Senators: A History of the U.S. Supreme Court Appointments from Washington to Clinton. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

Ackerman, Bruce. 1991. We the People: Foundations. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

———. 2005. The Failure of the Founding Fathers: Jefferson, Marshall, and the Rise of Presidential Democracy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Adams, John, Samuel Adams, and James Bowdoin. 1780. Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. http://www.mass.gov/legis/const.htm (accessed December 26, 2010).

Alexander, Larry, and Frederick Schauer. 1997. On Extrajudicial Constitutional Interpretation. Harvard Law Review 110, no. 7 (May): 1359–87.

Alito, Samuel. 2006. Statements at U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Hearing on Judge Samuel Alito’s Nomination to the Supreme Court. U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, January 9–11.

Ansolabehere, Stephen, James Snyder Jr., and Charles Stewart III. 2001. Candidate Positioning in U.S. House Elections. American Journal of Political Science 45, no. 1 (January): 136–59.

Arnold, Douglas. 1990. The Logic of Congressional Action. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Bafumi, Joseph, Andrew Gelman, David Park, and Noah Kaplan. 2005. Practical Issues in Implementing and Understanding Bayesian Ideal Point Estimation. Political Analysis 13, no. 2: 171–87.

Bailey, Michael. 2001. Ideal Point Estimation with a Small Number of Votes: A Random Effects Approach. Political Analysis 9, no. 3: 192–210.

———. 2007. Comparable Preference Estimates across Time and Institutions for the Court, Congress and Presidency. American Journal of Political Science 51, no. 3 (July): 433–48.

Bailey, Michael, and Kelly Chang. 2001. Comparing Presidents, Senators, and Justices: Inter-Institutional Preference Estimation. Journal of Law, Economics and Organization 17, no. 2 (October): 477–506.

———. 2003. Extremists on the Court: The Inter-Institutional Politics of Supreme Court Appointments. Manuscript. Georgetown University.

Bailey, Michael, and Forrest Maltzman. 2008. Does Legal Doctrine Matter? Unpacking Law and Policy Preferences on the U.S. Supreme Court. American Political Science Review 102, no. 3 (August): 369–84.

Bailey, Michael, Brian Kamoie, and Forrest Maltzman. 2005. Signals from the Tenth Justice: The Political Role of the Solicitor General in Supreme Court Decision-Making. American Journal of Political Science 49, no. 1 (January): 72–85.

Baker, Frank. 1992. Item Response Theory. New York: Marcel Dekker.

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