Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice

By Catherine Bliss | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I AM GRATEFUL for the love, generosity, and guidance of many people. First, I thank the scientists who warmly shared their thoughts with me. I went into my first interviews with a dry list of practical questions and came out understanding the complex commitments and concerns at the heart of genomic science. I especially thank the people who showed me how they accomplish their research, and those who have continued to communicate with me as I have completed this book. The honesty and forthrightness with which these scientists approach the difficult topic of race gives me hope for our collective future.

Thanks are due to Orville Lee, who taught me how to think sociologically. If there is anything of value in this research, it is surely because he has shaped it. Sarah Daynes tirelessly met with me at my every request to hash out whatever piece of theory was troubling me. Oz Frankel continuously monitored my success and sparked a drive to write my own histories of the present. Whether we were talking about science studies or cultural sociology, Vera Zolberg’s enlightening esprit has shined on me. Troy Duster exceeded my every expectation. From helping me set my course to introducing me to essential scholarship and its creators, Troy has been a pillar of my entire research process. His continuing support is a great inspiration to me.

During the early research process, I benefited from the critical attention of Ruha Benjamin, Manuel Vallée, Brian Folk, Gwen D’Arcangelis, and Nat Turner at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as the support of the

-ix-

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Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 1- The New Science of Race 19
  • 2- Making Science Racial 38
  • 3- The Sociogenomic Paradigm 70
  • 4- Making Sense of Race with Values 100
  • 5- Everyday Race-Positive 135
  • 6- Activism and Expertise 166
  • 7- The Enduring Trouble with Race 192
  • Notes 207
  • Index 257
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