Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice

By Catherine Bliss | Go to book overview
Save to active project

1 The New Science of Race

CONCEPTIONS OF RACE are never a closed case of self-evident truths. “Race” is a cipher for a set of relational meanings—meanings of difference that are always underdetermined, pliant, and manifold. Although the term seems to connote a specific set of physical or cultural characteristics, there is actually no fixed referent for race. It is “constantly resignified, made to mean something different in different cultures, in different historical formations, at different moments of time.”1

Scientists make new meaning of race as they pragmatically respond to a range of official and unofficial policies, norms, and values, which are constantly being reworked. Knowing the historical background of policies surrounding official racial classification is but a first step in understanding how legacies frame present-day practice and how the political climate informs choices made in the lab and field.2

Technologies like haplotype mapping and principal components analysis— the state of the art in the production of genomic taxonomies—also shape how scientists define populations, compare their classifications with self-reported identities, and create new avenues for identity formation. The application of these technologies around the world in the present U.S.-dominated bioeconomy has led to a hegemony of American racial taxonomies. Meanwhile, just as race-based medicine has hit the market, “whole genome sequencing” (technologies that map and interpret individual genomes in full) and the promise of a move to personalized medical healthcare are forecasting a departure from racial grouping. We must uncover what it means for scientists to

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 265

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.