The Illustration of the Master: Henry James and the Magazine Revolution

By Amy Tucker | Go to book overview

Works Cited

A list of abbreviations for frequently cited texts is provided on page xxv.

Abbott, Charles D. Howard Pyle: A Chronicle. New York: Harper, 1921.

Agnew, Jean-Christophe. “The Consuming Vision of Henry James.” The Culture of Consumption. Ed. Richard Wightman Fox and T. J. Jackson Lears. New York: Pantheon, 1983. 67–100.

Albers, Christina E. A Reader’s Guide to the Short Stories of Henry James. New York: G. K. Hall, 1997.

Alden, Henry Mills. Magazine Writing and the New Literature. New York: Harper, 1908.

Allingham, Philip V. “Arthur Hopkins’s Illustrations for the Monthly Serialisation of Thomas Hardy’s The Return of the Native.” Victorian Web. November 28, 2004. www.victorianweb.org (accessed January 16, 2009).

Anesko, Michael. “Friction with the Market”: Henry James and the Profession of Authorship. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

———. Letters, Fictions, Lives: Henry James and William Dean Howells. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Austin, J. L. How to Do Things with Words. Ed. J. O. Urmson and Marina Sbisa. 2nd ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1975.

Bailey, Brigitte. “The Protected Witness: Cole, Cooper, and the Tourist’s View of the Italian Landscape.” American Iconology: New Approaches to Nineteenth-Century Art and Literature. Ed. David C. Miller. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993. 92–111.

Baker, Nicholson. Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper New York: Vintage, 2002.

Bal, Mieke. “On Looking and Reading: Word and Image, Visual Poetics, and Comparative Arts.” Semiotica 76.3–4 (1989): 283–320.

Barchas, Janine. Graphic Design, Print Culture, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Bazargan, Susan. “Representation and Ideology in ‘The Real Thing.’” Henry James Review 12.2 (Spring 1991): 133–37.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Illustration of the Master: Henry James and the Magazine Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.