Conspiracy of Silence: Sportswriters and the Long Campaign to Desegregate Baseball

By Chris Lamb | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
THE COLOR LINE
IS DRAWN

Alfred Henry Spink published the first issue of the Sporting News on March 17, 1886, in an office building at 11 North Eighth Street in St. Louis, Missouri. The entrepreneurial Spink saw the opportunity to capitalize on the growing popularity of baseball in the United States. Spink wanted to duplicate the success of the sports weekly the Sporting Life, which was published in Philadelphia. He had a vision of how to make the Sporting News the best sports publication in the country, and he had the ambition and the drive to accomplish it. Spink had once worked as a newsboy for iconic newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “When we were young boys, working for the St. Louis dailies for $5 a week,” Spink later said, “Joe used to say, ‘Given a good business manager and an editor who can really write, any newspaper should fast become a good paying institution.’” Spink became editor, and his brother Charles served as business manager. Within two months of his first issue, the eight-page Sporting News

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conspiracy of Silence: Sportswriters and the Long Campaign to Desegregate Baseball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Part 1 1
  • Chapter 1 - White Sportswriters and Minstrel Shows 3
  • Part 2 27
  • Chapter 2 - The Color Line Is Drawn 29
  • Chapter 3 - Invisible Men 57
  • Chapter 4 - “Agitators” and “Social-Minded Drum Beaters” 85
  • Part 3 107
  • Chapter 5 - “l’Affaire Jake Powell” 109
  • Chapter 6 - Major League Managers and Ballplayers Call for End of Color Line 133
  • Part 4 157
  • Chapter 7 - The Double V Campaign 159
  • Chapter 8 - “The Great White Father” Speaks 187
  • Chapter 9 - Black Editors Make Their Case for Desegregation 217
  • Chapter 10 - “Get Those Niggers off the Field” 249
  • Part 5 281
  • Chapter 11 - Robinson Becomes the Chosen One 283
  • Part 6 305
  • Chapter 12 - “I Never Want to Take Another Trip like This One” 307
  • Notes 335
  • Bibliography 363
  • Index 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 397

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.