From Gods to God: How the Bible Debunked, Suppressed, or Changed Ancient Myths & Legends

By Avigdor Shinan; Yair Zakovitch et al. | Go to book overview

Index
Aaron: and the Cushite woman, 176; making the golden calf, 101, 102; and Sea of Reeds, 38; sons of, 104
Abarbanel, Isaac: description, 271; Samson’s birth, 190–91
Abigail: beauty of, 254; betraying husband, 255; compared to Bathsheba, 252–53, 256; immodest behavior of, 255; and menstrual blood, 255–56; pleading with David, 250–51; possibly pregnant by Nabal, 257; and relations with David, 254
Abimelech, 225, 229
Abraham: birth and youth of, 138; burning house of idols, 144; compared to Mordecai, 226; in Gerar, 224–25; presenting Sarah as sister, 223; reasons for journey to Canaan, 139–43; rescued from furnace, 144, 146–47, 148; sending servant to find wife for Isaac, 230; suspecting servant defiled Rebekah, 235; ten tests of, 140, 143, 147
Abram. See Abraham
Absalom, 238
Additions to Esther: description, 271; Esther and Ahasuerus, 227
Alphabet of Ben Sira: description, 271; Solomon and queen of Sheba, 265–66
Amnon and Tamar, 233
angels: conceiving Samson, 189–92; requiring nourishment, 52–53; in Sodom and Gomorrah, 133–34; weeping, 79, 80
Apocryphon of Joshua: description, 272; Moses’s birth, 169; Moses’s stopping sun, 59
Aramaic Targum to Psalms: ‘abirim, 14; description, 272; sea dragons, 14
Araunah, 69, 127–28
Artapanus: description, 272; Moses in Ethiopia, 173–74, 175, 177
Avot de-Rabbi Natan: Abraham’s ten tests, 140; description, 272; God as judge, 32
Baal: and creation story, 10; and Elisha, 184
barren women, 138, 165, 189, 195, 199–200, 203
Bathsheba: compared to Abigail, 252–53, 256; possibly pregnant by Uriah, 257–58
Beit Shemesh, 193
Benjamin, etymology of name, 82
Bethel: as cultic center, 69, 78, 79, 103, 120–21; as gate to heaven, 66–69; Jacob wrestling with God in, 78; as Jerusalem, 69–70; names of, 78–79
Bethlehem, site of Rachel’s burial, 84–87
Beth-on, 78–79, 82, 83
Bethuel, 232–33

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