Gourmets in the Land of Famine: The Culture and Politics of Rice in Modern Canton

By Seung-Joon Lee | Go to book overview
Contents
List of Maps, Figures, and Tablesix
Author’s Notexi
Acknowledgmentsxiii
Introduction1
Part One Feeding the City of Gourmets
1. South of the Mountains: The Political Economy of the Pearl River Delta21
2. The Organization of Rice Supplies in Canton: The Formation of the Cantonese Provisioning Networks for Consumer Satisfaction38
3. Strengthening the Canton–Hong Kong Ties: Rice Relief and the Development of the Transnational Rice Business63
4. Politicizing the Enterprise: The Nationalist Revolution and the Cantonese Rice Business86
Part Two Saving the Nation from Famine
5. Taste in Numbers: Science and the Chinese Food Problem113
6. Taxes and Strikes: The Foreign-Rice Tax and Its Social Repercussions136
7. Inventing “National Rice”: The National Goods Movement and the Issue of Rice Quality154
8. Granary of the Empire, Laboratory of the Nation: The Canton-Hankow Railway and the Hunan Rice Sales Project in Canton175
9. Provincial Politics and National Rice: The Canton Famine of 1936–1937 and the South China Rice Trading Corporation196
Conclusion215

-vii-

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