Gourmets in the Land of Famine: The Culture and Politics of Rice in Modern Canton

By Seung-Joon Lee | Go to book overview

4 Politicizing the Enterprise
THE NATIONALIST REVOLUTION
AND THE CANTONESE RICE BUSINESS

What interrupted the rice influx to Canton was not only international market fluctuation, but also political upheavals that swept through Canton as well as through the whole of China. From the last decade of the Qing dynasty to the mid-1920s, when the Nationalists consolidated their power base in Canton and embarked on a number of political experiments under the banner of the First United Front with the Chinese Communist Party, Canton was entirely exposed to the turbulent political struggles of Republican China. With the rapidly changing political milieu around the city, in Canton the rice trade had to be more than a business. Likewise, rice relief work during rice shortages had to be more than charity for the urban poor. From the viewpoint of the Cantonese mercantile elite, gaining a public reputation through rice relief was not enough to guarantee the safe and stable management of their businesses. They also had to consider the rapidly changing political context, because a series of revolutions provided a new political meaning to business as well. From the viewpoint of the revolutionaries who came to seize the municipal power, the provisioning of the Revolution would rely entirely on the Cantonese rice business, yet it was not entirely trustworthy. How would the lifeline of the revolution be defended? Who would be the most reliable rice suppliers? Would Guomindang members and the local mercantile elite cooperate and collaborate with each other? Or would they clash? These questions became the cornerstones of the political agenda.

This chapter will trace the course that rice took into the center of political struggles. Much has been written about the political upheavals and key figures of this time, from the 1911 Revolution to the Nationalist Revolution, from Sun Yat-sen to the rise of Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong. Yet one simple question has not been asked: who fed them? In the rising

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gourmets in the Land of Famine: The Culture and Politics of Rice in Modern Canton
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.