Post-Classical Hollywood: Film Industry, Style and Ideology since 1945

By Barry Langford | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Numerous people have contributed, without necessarily always knowing it, to the development of the ideas that inform this book. My thanks to several generations of students on my Post-Classical Hollywood course at Royal Holloway, University of London, who have helped enormously, often by making me answer – and ask – questions I would not otherwise have considered. My colleagues in the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway have offered extremely helpful feedback and canny insights when various parts of this project have been presented at departmental research seminars. Dr Jacob Leigh read some chapters in draft form and responded in a characteristically helpful and constructive fashion. Part of Chapter 9 was presented as a paper at the 2007 Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Philadelphia; my thanks to the conference committee, to the British Academy for the award of an Overseas Conference Grant allowing me to make the trip, and to the audience at the Contemporary Filmmakers panel who responded in such stimulating and challenging ways to my thoughts on Steven Spielberg and the dialectic of spectacle.

The research and writing of the book were supported by the Faculty of Arts at Royal Holloway, which offered an invaluable period of sabbatical leave in 2007, and the Department of Media Arts, who funded a trip to gather research on moviegoing in Columbus, Ohio. In Columbus, my warmest thanks to Professor David Stebenne of the Department of History at The Ohio State University for his hospitality; and a particular thanks to David’s graduate student Frank Blazich, who undertook vital long-distance research assistance at a late stage of drafting the book.

At Edinburgh University Press, Sarah Edwards saw the book through the commissioning stage, and Esmé Watson was helpful and – not least – patient as several deadlines came and went without the manuscript arriving. My thanks and I hope it was worth the wait.

-ix-

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Post-Classical Hollywood: Film Industry, Style and Ideology since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - Hollywood in Transition 1945–65 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Autumn of the Patriarchs 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Communication of Ideas 45
  • Chapter 3 - Modernising Hollywood 73
  • Part II - Crisis and Renaissance 1966–81 97
  • Chapter 4 - The Changing of the Guard 107
  • Chapter 5 - New Wave Hollywood 133
  • Chapter 6 - Who Lost the Picture Show? 157
  • Part III - New Hollywood 1982–2006 181
  • Chapter 7 - Corporate Hollywood 191
  • Chapter 8 - Culture Wars 219
  • Chapter 9 - Post-Classical Style? 245
  • Conclusion- ‘Hollywood’ Now 269
  • Appendix 285
  • Further Reading 287
  • Index 295
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