Without Regard to Race: The Other Martin Robison Delany

By Tunde Adeleke | Go to book overview

PREFACE

My initial introduction to Martin Delany occurred in 1977 during my senior year at the University of Ife (now Obafemi Awolowo University) in Nigeria. By some fortuitous circumstance, that year the history department chose for the mandatory honors “Special Paper” the course “Blacks in the New World.” It quickly became my favorite course as I was both moved and captivated by the enormity of the tragedy and rupture of enslavement and transplantation and by the heroic and indomitable spirit of survival and resistance that slaves and free blacks demonstrated. I completed the course yearning for more knowledge and a deeper understanding of the African Diaspora. Fortunately, it was a time when in universities in Nigeria, and indeed in many other African universities, there was a growing demand for increased knowledge of the African Diaspora. In the 1970s, African universities increasingly began to offer courses and programs that emphasized the connections between Africans and blacks in the Diaspora. The prevailing conviction was that both constituted two sides of the same coin. Consequently, no understanding of African history was considered complete without an understanding of the history of blacks in the Diaspora, and vice versa. After my degree in African studies, it became logical for me to pursue postgraduate studies in African American history. In other words, I embarked upon a search for knowledge and understanding of the other side of the coin.

In Nigeria, our study of the black Diaspora focused attention on and illuminated certain themes, especially those relating to radical, antiestablishment, anti-imperial values and schemes. Hence, we spent more time on topics such as abolitionism, nationalism, Pan-Africanism, the civil rights movement, and Black Power. This was taking place within a broader historical context—the ascendance of postcolonial

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Without Regard to Race: The Other Martin Robison Delany
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.