Without Regard to Race: The Other Martin Robison Delany

By Tunde Adeleke | Go to book overview

SIX
Final Years
1878–1885

THE VICTORY OF the Democrats provided an opportunity to test the depth of their commitment to the “liberal” promises they made during the campaign. Would Delany’s optimism be vindicated, or would the Democrats renege on their promises? But first, the victory called for celebration. To South Carolina Democrats, the return to political power heralded the dawn of a “progressive age.” According to the News and Courier, thanks to the rapid developments in railroads, white Carolinians celebrated this “new age” with mass vacation trips to the plains of the state and to Georgia.1 The gaieties of the period, according to an eyewitness, rivaled those of antebellum days. Democrats traveled and held picnics, parties, and balls in celebration of the demise of Reconstruction.2 It soon became obvious that blacks were not expected to reap any lasting benefits from the conservative victory and from the prospects of their new “progressive age.”

Governor Hampton, however, did try to fulfill his campaign pledges. Delany was one of prominent blacks he appointed to office, restoring him to his trial justice post in Charleston. He also appointed several Republicans to office. In a message to the General Assembly, he urged its members to remain faithful to the campaign promises. In his inaugural speech, Hampton reiterated the need for interracial harmony and for the recognition and protection of all the civil and political rights of blacks. At the Aiken Schuetzenfast in April 1878, recalling the campaign

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Without Regard to Race: The Other Martin Robison Delany
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xix
  • One Black Biography - From Instrumentalism to Functionalism 3
  • Two - Delany Historiography 19
  • Three First Integrationist Phase - Moral Suasion, 1830–1849 40
  • Four - Second Integrationist Phase 1863–1874 70
  • Five - Third Integrationist Phase 1875-1877 135
  • Six - Final Years 1878–1885 161
  • Conclusion 178
  • Appendix A - "A Political Review" 194
  • Appendix B - "Trial and Conviction" 210
  • Notes 228
  • Bibliography 256
  • Index 269
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