Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965

By Francis French; Colin Burgess | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Foreword
Reflections of a Golden Era

During the extraordinarily dynamic period covered in this book, Paul
Haney became widely known as NASA’S “voice of Mission Control, “and
later its “voice of Apollo.” A journalist and news editor from Akron,
Ohio, Haney joined the fledgling space agency as an information offi-
cer based in Washington DC and later served in NASA’S Public Affairs
Office as its first news director. In 1963 he moved to Houston’s Manned
Spacecraft Center (later the Johnson Space Center [JSC]) as NASA’S pub-
lic affairs officer in their Office of Manned Spaceflight
.

In October 1957 the Soviet Union launched its Sputnik satellite. It shocked, surprised, amazed, and confounded the federal establishment in Washington. At the time I was working for the 140-year-old Washington Evening Star.

Following the Sputnik announcement the Star commissioned me to do something that usually preceded a congressional vote on whether to go to war—a special section called a “man-in-the-street” reaction. The national reaction went deep: a majority decided there was something wrong with America’s education system. Teachers began doubting the efficacy of the McGuffey Reader, an educational standard since the 1840s. At the very least, the Soviet space challenge ushered something called New Math into American grade schools.

In December 1958 I quit the Star, having accepted an invitation to join America’s brand-new space agency, NASA, as their first news division chief. To me, the space challenge seemed capable of becoming at least as big as the opening up of the western United States, 150 years earlier. It was one of the few times in my life when I guessed right.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 398

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?