Silent Gesture: Autobiography of Tommie Smith

By Tommie Smith; David Steele | Go to book overview

2
October 16, 1968

I CANNOT SAY what I remember most about that night in Mexico City because I remember everything. How could I possibly forget anything about it? Every detail, from the position of the starting blocks to the feeling of crossing the finish line—and after I crossed the finish line. What happened that night, October 16, 1968, was history, and you’d better believe I was aware of what was going on every second.

It began long before the starting blocks on the Olympic Stadium track for the men’s 200-meter final. But the starting blocks are, yes, a good place to start. As I stood behind the blocks, my whole life went through my head, as a child in Texas and in California, as a student in grammar school and high school, and all my experiences in college, especially the political times, and now, 24 years old and the fastest man in the world, standing at the starting line at the XIXth Olympiad ready to prove it. You’d be surprised when you are to call upon everything, how quickly you can remember nothing. But I had no choice; I had to remember this. It would be devastating for me to forget any of it; I could not forget, because to forget was to lose sight of what I was there for. Of course, I was there to win the race, but winning the race meant much more than picking up the gold medal. It meant the sacrifices that Tommie Smith had gone through the previous year and a half—the catcalls, the threats on my life, the letters in the mail, the mock tickets back to Africa, all the different names they were calling us. I was afraid for my wife Denise and my son Kevin, who was just a baby then; I was afraid for their lives because everyone knew where we lived.

Usually a runner just before a race will stretch, shake, jiggle, somehow exercise the legs, arms, muscles, ligaments, tendons—keep the body loose and warmed up. But I was exercising my thought processes,

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Silent Gesture: Autobiography of Tommie Smith
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1 - Welcome Home 1
  • 2 - October 16, 1968 20
  • 3 - Out of the Fields 42
  • 4 - The Biggest City I Had Ever Seen 73
  • 5 - Run before You Walk 95
  • 6 - The Coach and the Professor 114
  • 7 - Linked Forever 135
  • 8 - No Gold, No Glove 148
  • 9 - Paying the Price 172
  • 10 - Going Underground 194
  • 11 - Families Lost, and Found 211
  • 12 - It Will Outlive Me 233
  • Epilogue - Silent and Eternal 255
  • Acknowledgments 259
  • Index 261
  • About the Authors 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.