Contemporary Scottish Poetry

By Matt McGuire; Colin Nicholson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
Aonghas MacNeacail

Peter Mackay

Aonghas MacNeacail (1942–) is the most prolific of the generation of Gaelic poets who came to prominence in the 1970s and 1980s and who were celebrated in Christopher Whyte's 1991 anthology An Aghaidh na Siorraidheachd/In the Face of Eternity. MacNeacail is also an English language poet of some note; indeed it was in English that he first began writing and published his first collection, Imaginary Wounds (1980). Another English collection followed – Rock and Water (1990) – but since the early 1980s MacNeacail's output has mainly been in Gaelic with accompanying English translations: book-length poems (in collaboration with the artist Simon Fraser) Sireadh Bradain Sicir/Seeking Wise Salmon (1983) and An Cathadh Mòr/The Great Snowbattle (1984) have been followed by the collections an seachnadh agus dàin eile/the avoiding and other poems (1986), Oideachadh Ceart agus Dàin Eile / A Proper Schooling and Other Poems (1996) and laoidh an donais òig/hymn to a young demon (2007) as well as librettos – An Sgathach/ Warrior Queen and An Turas (The Trip) (c. 1993) – and scripts for radio, television, film and stage.

That MacNeacail writes in both Gaelic and English is no surprise. Born in the Isle of Skye in 1942, the poet was raised in Gaelic until he went to primary school, where education was entirely through the medium of English. After his schooldays (in which he learned Gaelic, in effect, as a foreign language) MacNeacail left Skye to work for British Rail, in a London housing office and also to take a degree at Glasgow University, where he was a member, along with Tom Leonard, James Kelman, Alasdair Gray and Liz Lochhead, of the Philip Hobsbaum writing group. Until 1977, when he took up the post of sgrìobhadair, or writer-in-residence, at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, MacNeacail wrote poetry predominantly in English. From 1977 on he has been almost exclusively a Gaelic poet, and has used only his Gaelic name (some earlier work had appeared under the English ‘Angus Nicolson’). This negotiation between Gaelic and English that MacNeacail has engaged in throughout his life, and the corresponding voyage between Gaelic and various other cultural traditions, is central to much of MacNeacail's poetry. The poetic persona that

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Scottish Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.