Exploring Arab Folk Literature

By Pierre Cachia | Go to book overview
Contents
Acknowledgementsvii
Foreword by Professor Clive Holesxi
Introductionxvii
The Transcription of Both Classical and Colloquial Arabicxx
Part 1. Fact Finding
1.Arabic Literatures, ‘Elite’ and ‘Folk’–Junctions and Disjunctions Quaderni di Studi Arabi, Nuova serie, 3 (2008)3
2.The Egyptian Mawwāl: Its Ancestry, its Development, and its Present Forms Journal of Arabic Literature, 8 (1977)19
3.The Nahda’s First Stirrings of Interest in Alf Layla (previously unpublished).42
4.The Career of Muṣṭafā >Ibrāhɪm Across Cultures, ed. Daniel Massa (Valletta, Malta, 1977)51
Part 2. Single or Related Items
5.The Prophet’s Shirt: Three Versions of an Egyptian Narrative Ballad Journal of Semitic Studies, 26, 1 (1981)61
6.An Uncommon Use of Nonsense Verse in Colloquial Arabic Journal of Arabic Literature, 14 (1983)89
7.An Early Example of Narrative Verse in Colloquial Arabic Journal of Arabic Literature, 21, 2 (September 1990)96
8.An Incomplete Egyptian Ballad on the 1956 War Tradition and Modernity in Arabic Language and Literature, ed. J. R. Smart (Richmond, 1996)102
9.An Honour Crime with a Difference first published as ‘Three Versions of an Egyptian Narrative Ballad’, Proceedings of First International Conference on Middle Eastern Popular Culture, Magdalen College, Oxford (17–21 September 2000)112
10.Pulp Stories in the Repertoire of Egyptian Folk Singers British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, 33, 2 (November 2006)119

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