T.H. Jones: Poet of Exile

By P. Bernard Jones; Don Dale-Jones | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
1966–2000
It was Always the Colour of the Cockrow

Over the next decade T. H. Jones’s reputation declined in both Australia and Wales. An award in his memory was established in Newcastle and its first winner was, appropriately, the Chatterton of Australian poetry, Michael Dransfield, ‘who from precocious adolescence to his death at the age of twentyfour seems to have rejected all possible solutions except extinction’.1 Jones did not feature in the key defining anthology of Anglo-Welsh poetry, Welsh Voices,2 and had only a single poem3 in This World of Wales.4 He had five poems in The Lilting House5 and fourteen in Twelve Modern Anglo-Welsh Poets,6 but was not one of the poets in Ten Anglo-Welsh Poets.1 In 1976 Meic Stephens, a consistent admirer, commissioned the monograph by Julian Croft8 and out of this, also at Meic Stephens’s instigation, arose the Collected Poems.9 The translations of poems by Roberto Sanesi which had appeared in Songs of a Mad Prince were omitted to save space and because the editors considered that they had been included in that weakest of the four volumes largely to bulk it out.10 Julian Croft was able, as a result, to make a selection of twenty-nine previously uncollected poems from the Black Book.11

A typical 1970s assessment is that of Roland Mathias:

At first over-impressed by Dylan Thomas, and later by all kinds
of literary concepts, Harri gradually leaves the artificial virtuoso
performance of his second book, Songs of a Mad Prince (which
reads very much as though it consisted of rejects from his first),
for a clearer personal statement. Because he was rarely able,
even towards the end, to treat love without some literary as well
as physical posturing, his most impressive poems are about his
childhood, about Wales and guilt, about the impossibility of
going back, the unsatisfactoriness of going faithless on.12

-266-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
T.H. Jones: Poet of Exile
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.