Ethiopia and the United States: History, Diplomacy, and Analysis

By Getachew Metaferia | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I wish to acknowledge Ethiopians and Americans who have been involved in building relations between an old and a new nation through formal diplomatic channels and informal people-to-people public diplomacy efforts. Government officials and functionaries, as well as private citizens, have served as their respective countries’ official and unofficial ambassadors. American citizens who have worked in Ethiopia and loved it have been bridge builders between peoples. Ethiopians who have lived in the US and loved it have cultivated solid relationships with Americans and have fostered a positive image of their country. They have all played significant roles in bringing the two countries closer, be it at state or at public levels.

I wish also to acknowledge the following persons and organizations for their particular contributions:

My wife, Dr. Maigenet Shifferraw, for her unfailing support and her critical comment on the manuscript, and my daughters Tigist and Helina, son Kaleb and niece Messeret Taye, and my brother-in-law, the late Matiwos Shifferraw, who was supportive of my scholarship. Helina’s imaginative work on the cover picture depicts the 1700-year-old obelisk at Axum, northern Ethiopia, and the 224-year-old Washington Monument. I am grateful to my family for their support of all my professional endeavors and in the consummation of this book;

The librarians at the Carter Presidential Library in Atlanta, Georgia and at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland;

Fantahun Tiruneh, reference librarian, the Library of Congress, Tewodros Abebe, Assistant Archivist, Howard University, and Theodros Dagne, Specialist in African Affairs, US Congressional Research Service, for their assistance in my queries and research;

Morgan State University for providing me with funds to conduct research at the Carter Presidential Library;

Dr. Max Hilaire, Chair of Department of Political Science at Morgan State University, for his continuous support; and

Many respected individuals and friends provided me with documents, gave interviews, commented on this work, and extended their support. The list could be longer, but space allows me to mention the following only:

Catherine E. Byme, former Director for African Affairs at the National Security Council; Professors Mario D. Fenyo of Bowie State University; the late Dejazmach Zewde Gabre-Sellassie; member of Ethiopian Parliament and professor at Addis Ababa University, Dr. Merera Gudina; Dr. Tekola W. Hagos, formerly advisor to Ethiopia’s Minister of Foreign Affairs; Ato Abate Kassa; Ambassador Kassa Kebede; Ato Mulugeta Lule; Ambassador Ayalew Mandefro; Professor Dr. Tesfatsion Medhanie of the University of Bremen, Germany; Dr. Birhanu Nega, elect mayor of Addis Ababa in 2005; my former teacher, colleague, and friend, Professor Sulayman S. Nyang of Howard University;

-xiii-

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